Education Quality… Made in Malaysia

Making quality is not a simple issue nowadays with the phenomenon of technology and desire to penetrating markets fast to gain huge revenues from modern products in different fields. In the shadows of this reality, delivering quality education was affected by a negative model of social and economical problems all around the world.

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Education Quality… Made in Malaysia

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Making quality is not a simple issue nowadays with the phenomenon of technology and desire to penetrating markets fast to gain huge revenues from modern products in different fields. In the shadows of this reality, delivering quality education was affected by a negative model of social and economical problems all around the world.

Here, malaysia raises not only as a powerful economical and tourist power but also as an educational hub with a special place on the world map, on the highest academic levels world-wide.

I believe the secret behind this advancement in Malaysia lies in managing quality in educational institutions. Those who did not spare an effort since years in establishing leading perspectives in education methods, as it sees in education a way for building a powerful and advanced society, leading to generations able of improving all institutions. Education will always be the way to the advancement of nations, everywhere, anytime.

Malaysia also invested huge amounts of money in developing its education and universities in the last 20 years. A great work that is paying back today with UM university claiming 70th place in the world universities list by ‘Quacquarelli Symonds’, which ranks the best 1001 universities.

This Malaysian achievement proves the big advancement the Malaysian education reached in the last couple of years, and that enabled Malaysian universities to be along with the best global and regional education institutions, to put Malaysia's name up with the highest academic institutions in the world.

As a result of all that, Malaysian universities became a hub for more than 150,000 foreign students from 100 countries around the world. A message of value and place for Malaysia in the world.

On top of that, Malaysia became a center for educational research in different academic and education specialities, and Malaysian universities recieve a lot of research requests from global medicine companies to improve productivity.

Malaysian private universities sector was not absent in ‘QS’ ratings for 2020. despite the educational and academic differences between governmental and private education institutions in Malaysia, private universities achieved a special place allowing it to contribute big in the Malaysian education market.

Aside from the academic part of Malaysian education, there is an important matter and that is developing human resources, as the education system works on training students for jobs that don’t require academic skills with professional education which allows students to enhance their technical skills directly.

Here we have to mention the 2015 - 2025 education and development plan by the government and education ministry, which aims to enhance professional skills as a parallel way to higher education and adding success to students lives after graduation these institutions with all the experiences and skills.

Abu Dhabi, Dubai “most resilient cities” in the Middle East

Abu Dhabi and Dubai are among the Top 30 “most resilient cities”

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Abu Dhabi, Dubai “most resilient cities” in the Middle East

 

DUBAI – “ASWAQ”

Abu Dhabi and Dubai are the “most resilient cities” in the Middle East in terms of city wealth (GDP), personal wealth (households with an income greater than US$70,000), and demographics, according to ‘The Resilient Cities Index’, a new research by the global real estate advisor, Savills.

Abu Dhabi and Dubai are among the Top 30 “most resilient cities”, and will remain so till 2028. Savills' ‘Resilient Cities Index’ examined cities' ability to withstand or embrace the technological, demographic, and leadership disruption facing global real estate today and in 10 years' time.

According to Savills’ data, Abu Dhabi is currently rated 22nd “most resilient city” globally, higher than a decade ago when it was rated 25th. While the region's financial capital, Dubai, will see its rating improving one notch to 26th place in the next 10 years from the current 27th ranking. Kuwait City, Riyadh and Jeddah currently make up the other Top 5 “most resilient cities”, but by 2028, Riyadh is set to overtake Kuwait City.

Wealth Monitor’s managing director, Arshad Khan, said one key factor for any country is to keep up with the competition and quickly adapt and embrace new technologies and innovative approaches.

Khan said, "That way the UAE is good as they keep on adapting new technologies and innovative solutions. The UAE is far ahead in artificial intelligence, blockchain and other new-age technologies not just regionally but globally also.”

Khan added, "I would give top-most rating to the UAE's leadership and its vision. There is a continuity in the vision and implementation strategy. We are so much bullish about India just because there is a strong leadership.” He credited the UAE's leadership for bringing the country at par with the world's best cities and countries in socio-economic status.

The Middle East region is also home to the "challenger cities" identified in Savills’ research. The report specifically identifies Riyadh and Jeddah as among the eight that will make the biggest leaps up the ranking in the next decade, alongside the likes of Nanjing, Hangzhou, Delhi, and Mumbai. Savills’ Research rated Hangzhou, Riyadh, Nanjing, Ningbo, Delhi, Mumbai, Jeddah and Bengaluru as the top challenger cities.

Paul Tostevin, director in Savills world research, said, “All our ‘challenger city’ contenders are from China, India and the Middle East. While some of these, such as Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru, Riyadh and Jeddah are known internationally, they are generally yet to make it onto the global real estate investors’ radar.”

"For real estate investors, our “Resilient Cities” index shows that the long-established global cities will withstand much in the next decade, which is why they have seen high levels of investment as they are perceived as 'safe havens' for capital, with the top 10 global destinations for both domestic and cross-border capital in 2018 reflecting this old world order. However, as a result, their real estate assets have become correspondingly expensive and highly sought after," Savill revealed.

In the past decade, the number of cities with gross domestic product (GDP) of more than US$50 billion has grown from 177 to 248. By 2028, this number is expected to increase to 317. Those cities with GDP over US$50 billion accounted for 83 per cent of global GDP in 2018, an increase from 79 per cent a decade ago. This is forecast to increase to 89 per cent over the next 10 years as the importance of cities continues to accelerate.

Globally, within 10 years China cities are expected to occupy 43 spots in Savills’ Top 100 Resilient Cities ranking while New York, Tokyo, London, and Los Angeles are currently Savills’ Top 4 cities most resilient to global disruption now and in 2028.

Simon Hope, head of global capital markets at Savills, said, "The list of the world's top global cities may feel like it is almost set in stone, but, as is becoming apparent, disruption is ‘on the menu’ and we are set to see some sweeping changes to the way society functions and how businesses operate in the next 10 years."

The study also showed that investors looking for long-term returns would find growth in Middle Eastern, Indian, and tier-two Chinese cities, Savills explained, as their markets are “likely to grow in the face of global disruption” in the coming decade, but remain relatively untapped at present.

Commenting on the findings, Savills' world research director, Sophie Chick, said: “What our eight 'Challenger Cities' have in common is that they are all likely to see substantial increases in their GDP and growth in household incomes, while their dependency ratios (the proportion of people of a non-working age to those of a working age) will either fall or increase at a lower rate than other major cities between now and 2028.”

Chick added, "This indicates that they are set to be young, prosperous, and able to adapt to changes in the way the world operates at a faster pace than some better known locations.”

Dubai’s Sovereign Wealth Fund revenue surges 15.7pc to US$63bn in 2018

Investment Corporation of Dubai (ICD), the emirate’s sovereign wealth fund, has announced its consolidated financial results for the year ended 31st December, 2018 recording revenues of Dh232.4 billion (US$63.1 billion) and a net profit of Dh21.4 billion, state news agency WAM reported.

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Dubai’s Sovereign Wealth Fund revenue surges 15.7pc to US$63bn in 2018

DUBAI – “ASWAQ”

Investment Corporation of Dubai (ICD), the emirate’s sovereign wealth fund, has announced its consolidated financial results for the year ended 31st December, 2018 recording revenues of Dh232.4 billion (US$63.1 billion) and a net profit of Dh21.4 billion, state news agency WAM reported.

ICD ranks among the Middle East’s 10 Biggest Sovereign Wealth funds, having recorded increase in revenues by 15.7 percent from 2017 with increases achieved in all key sectors and the highest income coming from the oil and gas sector.

Net profit was down 13.2 percent from the previous year, nevertheless it has benefited from continued strength in banking and financial services, which offset headwinds in transportation services due to increased fuel prices sparked by the rebound in oil prices this year versus last year, as well as the strength of the US dollar.  Net profit attributable to the equity holder of ICD was Dh16.3 billion, thus registering a 19.7 per cent decline from the prior year.

Assets increased by 4.1 percent to Dh879.2 billion, from 2017, mainly due to an increase in loans and receivables in the banking and financial services sector.

In the same period, liabilities increased by 4 percent to Dh641.5 billion due primarily from higher customer deposits while borrowings and lease liabilities remained flat.

The group’s share of equity increased by 4 per cent from the year-end position in 2017, as a result of retained profits.

ICD’s executive director and CEO, Mohammed Ibrahim Al Shaibani, said: "In 2018, ICD’s financial results reflect the resilience and continued growth of its portfolio companies, delivering a strong operational and financial performance despite the challenging market conditions and uncertainties.”

Al Shaibani added, “ICD remains focused on growing its key businesses by investing in opportunities and achieving operational efficiencies that will support long term growth and contribute to the prosperity of Dubai. "

Dubai has never had much oil, unlike its fellow emirate Abu Dhabi . This has forced it to diversify into other areas to build up its economy  such as financial services, real estate, tourism and trade. ICD acts as the the main investment arm of the Dubai government and has interests in many of these sectors.

ICD was established in May 2006 with the transfer of the government’s portfolio of investments from the Department of Finance’s Investment Division. Its main role is to supervise the government’s investment portfolio while adding value. The fund’s key investments include: Utilities & Energy Sector - Emirates National Oil Company (ENOC); Transportation Sector - Emirates Group, Dnata, Dubai Aerospace Enterprise (DAE), Dubai Duty Free Establishment; Financial Sector - Emirates NBD, Dubai Islamic Bank, Borse Dubai, Commercial Bank of Dubai, Union National Bank, National Bonds, Noor Islamic Bank, National Bank of Fujairah, HSBC Middle East Finance Company; Industrial Sector - Dubai Aluminium Company Limited (DUBAL), Dubai Cable Company (DUCAB), Cleveland Bridge & Engineering M.E. (Pvt.) Ltd. (CBEME), Jeema Mineral Water, Dubai Ice Plant & Cold Stores; Real Estate & Leisure Sector – Emaar Properties, Dubai World Trade Centre, Deira Investments, Dubai Development, Atlantis the Palm; Other Holdings- Dubai Investments, Emirates Rawabi, Galadari, Emirates Investment and Development, Dangote Cement.

In 2018, ICD agreed to buy 25 percent of Corporacion America Italia (CAI), a unit of New-York listed Corporacion America Airports , the world’s largest private airport operator, for an undisclosed sum. CAI is the controlling entity of Toscana Aeroporti, a public-traded Italian company that holds and manages the concessions for Florence and Pisa airports in Italy.

Saudi Arabia offers expats permanent residency for US$213,000

Saudi Arabia is offering a permanent residency program for expats that will be charged at US$ 213,000 (SAR 800,000). The Premium Residency Center (PRC), which manages the initiative, began receiving applications for the new residency system through the electronic platform SAPRC (saprc.gov.sa) recently.

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Saudi Arabia offers expats permanent residency for US$213,000

 

 

DUBAI – “ASWAQ”

 

Saudi Arabia is offering a permanent residency program for expats that will be charged at US$ 213,000 (SAR 800,000). The Premium Residency Center (PRC), which manages the initiative, began receiving applications for the new residency system through the electronic platform SAPRC (saprc.gov.sa) recently.

 

The new residency scheme, designed to attract foreign investment to the Kingdom, offers two types of residencies, a permanent one for SAR 800,000 (US$213,000) and a one year but renewable residency for SAR100,000 (US$27,000).

 

According to the PRC website, the residencies are named Unlimited Duration Premium Residency (SP-1) and Limited Duration Premium Residency (SP-2). The previous unofficial terms used for these residencies include Special Privilege Iqama and Saudi Green Card.

 

The law for premium residency was approved in May earlier this year, although the idea was first mooted in 2016 by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, as a part of his plan to reduce the economy’s reliance on oil and boost foreign direct investment (FDI).

 

The premium residency will allow holders to work in Saudi Arabia without a Saudi sponsor (commonly known as kafeel), own real estate, ability to travel out of Saudi without an exit re-entry visa, hire domestic workers and obtain visit visa for their relatives.

 

Currently over 10 million expats work and live in Saudi Arabia under a system that requires them to be sponsored by a Saudi employer and be issued an exit and re-entry visa whenever they want to leave the country.

 

PRC’s website has the complete list of rights and privileges that will be enjoyed by holders of premium residency, as stated:

1.Residence in the Kingdom with his/her family i.e. spouse(s), and children (Aged 21 and below);

  1. Visit visas for relatives;
  2. Recruitment of domestic workers from abroad according to his/her needs;
  3. Ownership of real estate for residential, commercial, and industrial purposes in Saudi except for Mecca, Medina and border areas;
  4. Usufruct rights on real property located in the cities of Mecca and Medina for a period not exceeding 99 years;
  5. Ownership of private means of transportation, and other movables;
  6. Working at private establishments with the ability to change jobs - this shall also extend to family members;
  7. Exiting and entering the Kingdom at his/her own accord;
  8. Use of lanes designated for Saudis at the Kingdom’s exit and entry points;
  9. Engagement in business activities, in accordance with the Foreign Investment Law.

 

Applications for premium residency are now available online, subject to the following conditions:

  1. Submitting a valid passport;
  2. The applicant must be at least 21 years of age;
  3. Providing proof of the applicant’s financial solvency;
  4. Submitting a criminal record that proves the applicant has no criminal precedents;
  5. Providing a medical report proving that the applicant has no communicable diseases;
  6. If applying from within the Kingdom, the applicant must be legally residing in the Kingdom.

 

The program is the latest among Gulf nations, with the UAE already granting wealthy foreigners 10-year stays, while Qatar passed a law that granted some permanent residencies. The move has prompted the Gulf nations to rethink the role of foreigners in their societies. It is a landmark move in a region where many foreign workers are subject to some of the world’s most restrictive residency rules.

 

While Saudi Arabia is seeking to encourage the affluent to stay, monthly fees imposed on foreign workers and their families, along with sluggish economic growth, have prompted hundreds of thousands of expatriates to leave. The levy is designed to spur private businesses to hire Saudi nationals.

 

The new system is said, by the Crown Prince at an interview with Al Arabiya, to be not undermining citizens' rights, but rather it will serve their interests. He said that the new residency scheme will be an important source of revenues to boost the Saudi economy and will contribute to the creation of jobs for the public. The program is expected to generate about US$10bn in annual revenue by 2020.

 

Analysts say the program will largely benefit wealthy Arabs who have lived in Saudi Arabia for years without permanent residency or multinational companies seeking to do long-term business in the kingdom.

Saudi Aramco Signs 12 multi-billion dollar deals with South Korean companies

Saudi Arabian energy company, Saudi Aramco, signed 12 deals with major South Korean companies worth billions of dollars, the Saudi company announced recently.

The agreements aim to strengthen relationships, expand international operations, and support the region’s energy security with the expansion of Arabian crude oil supply to Asian markets, according to the company’s statement.

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Saudi Aramco Signs 12 multi-billion dollar deals with South Korean companies

 

 

DUBAI – “ASWAQ”

Saudi Arabian energy company, Saudi Aramco, signed 12 deals with major South Korean companies worth billions of dollars, the Saudi company announced recently.

 

The agreements aim to strengthen relationships, expand international operations, and support the region's energy security with the expansion of Arabian crude oil supply to Asian markets, according to the company's statement.

 

 

The cooperation between Saudi Arabia and South Korea has gradually gained momentum during Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's reign. The Crown Prince visited Seoul recently for the first leg of his official visit to South Korea and Japan. During the talks with South Korean President Moon Jae-in, the Crown Prince emphasized enhanced strategic partnership between the two countries in several fields, including energy.

 

Saudi Aramco President and CEO, Amin Nasser, said Korean companies played a vital role in Saudi Aramco's upstream offshore growth development since a few decades ago. Since then, they have moved into other sectors in line with Saudi Aramco's diversification strategy. Saudi Arabia's new deals with South Korean companies deepen their bilateral business ties.

 

Nasser said, “The agreements mark a new era of co-operation with our Korean partners who will play an increasingly important role in our strategy to capitalise on new initiatives that include long-term energy supply, maritime and infrastructure development, and breakthrough research and development in the automotive, crude to chemicals, and non-metallic sectors.”

 

The agreements include shipbuilding, engine manufacturing, refining, petrochemicals, as well as crude supply, sales and storage. They are part of Aramco’s long-term strategy to shift into downstream (which refers to the refining and chemicals segments of the energy value chain) and expand and strengthen its portfolio in this category.

 

The agreement between Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI), Aramco and Saudi Arabian Industrial Investments Company (Dussur) is to establish a joint venture to build an engine manufacturing and aftersales facility in Saudi Arabia. Aramco will own 55 per cent of the venture, while HHI and Dussur will own 30 per cent and 15 per cent, respectively.

 

Aramco also signed a pact with HHI to increase the latter’s share in International Maritime Industries (IMI) to 20 per cent from 10 per cent, and two further pacts involving HHI, Saudi shipping company Bahri and IMI to explore co-operation in shipbuilding.

 

In April, Aramco and its subsidiary Aramco Trading Company also reached an agreement with Hyundai to acquire a 17 per cent stake in Oilbank, one of the South Korean company's subsidiaries, valued at US$1.25bn.

 

In line with a crude oil sales deal, Saudi Aramco will supply Arabian crude oil to South Korea-based Hyundai Oilbank, while Aramco Trading Company will supply non-Arabian crude oil to the Korean company under a crude oil agreement.

 

Another agreement signed with Korea National Oil Corporation will allow Saudi companies to explore the potential of crude oil storage in the country to complement its marketing and supply activities.

 

Aramco has also signed a pact with Hyundai Motor Company to accelerate the expansion of the hydrogen ecosystem in Saudi Arabia and South Korea, and explore the use of advanced non-metallic materials in the automotive and other industries.

 

Three other agreements signed with South Korean companies just recently were with Hyosung to build a car carbon fibre manufacturing facility in Saudi Arabia; R&D collaboration with GS Holdings to identify investment opportunities in Saudi Arabia; and to co-operate with Daelim Industrial on chemical product sales and development in the Kingdom.

 

Further, the company has also been looking to sell more products, and make new investments in refining and chemical assets, in the growing markets of Asia, from where much of the demand originates.

 

Saudi Arabia, which exported around 187,000 barrels of crude oil per day to South Korea in the first half of 2019, is the country's top oil supplier.

 

As part of its downstream expansion strategy, Aramco had in March this year, agreed to buy a 70 per cent stake in Sabic, the region’s biggest chemicals company, citing growth in petchems as central to its downstream expansion plan.

 

Last year, Aramco signed an agreement with state-owned Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (Adnoc) to jointly invest in a US$44 billion (Dh166bn) refinery on the west coast of India.

 

UAE VAT Revenues Exceeded Expectations in 2018

UAE’s value-added tax (VAT) collections , which came into effect in January last year, exceeded government expectations in 2018, thus boosting state coffers and proving credit positive for the country, according to a report from Moody’s credit rating agency.

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UAE VAT Revenues Exceeded Expectations in 2018

Dubai – ASWAQ

UAE's value-added tax (VAT) collections , which came into effect in January last year, exceeded government expectations in 2018, thus boosting state coffers and proving credit positive for the country, according to a report from Moody’s credit rating agency.

VAT collections were far higher than forecast in the first year of implementation, reaching Dh27 billion (US$7.4bn), compared to the government’s original projection of Dh12bn (US$3.3bn), according to government data published in May. The figure was even more than the government’s 2019 projection of Dh20bn (US$5.5bn).

Collections are said to have exceeded estimates on the back of strong compliance. Moody’s said in a recent report, “With non-oil sector growth still subdued, the strong VAT turnout was largely attributable to higher than expected compliance with the new law.”

“The government’s 2018 and 2019 VAT revenue forecasts had included conservative assumptions regarding the level of compliance in the initial years of implementation. Nonetheless, the robust level of compliance in the first year of the tax framework is a positive reinforcement of the UAE’s high institutional strength,” Moody’s analyst Thaddeus Best said in the report. The agency rates the UAE government "Aa2 stable".

Under the UAE’s VAT legislation, the Federal Government will retain 30 percent i.e. Dh8.1bn, while the remaining Dh18.9bn will be divided among the UAE’s seven emirates. The largest beneficiary of VAT was Dubai, which it estimated received approximately a 60 percent share of the revenue attributed to the emirates and 42 percent of total revenue.

Although the populations of Dubai and Abu Dhabi are fairly the same, Dubai benefits from a much higher tourism spending and a higher daytime population as workers commute in from other emirates.

Moody’s said, “The additional VAT receipts should help offset some of the losses to government revenues from the reduction in service fees that the government of Dubai recently implemented as part of its efforts to stimulate the economy in the face of decelerating non-oil real GDP growth.”

“Given this high level of compliance in the first year and our expectation for non-oil growth to remain subdued, we do not expect a significant increase in VAT collections in 2019,” Best said in the report. “It will nevertheless be higher than currently budgeted.”

The UAE introduced a 5 per cent tax on certain goods and services in January 2018, in line with other GCC states following an agreement between the six-country economic bloc. The aim is to boost government revenues and help diversify previously hydrocarbons-dependent regional economies during the crash in oil prices.

 

400 Expats Granted Gold Card Permanent Residency in UAE

The gold card is offered to exceptional professionals such as CEOs and real estate investors (property of more than Dh5 million), inventors, entrepreneurs and specialized doctors, teachers in rare fields, and ‘outstanding’ students with a grade of 95 percent or above in general secondary and university students with a grade of 3.75 and above. Executive managers with a monthly salary of Dh30,000 and above are also eligible for the long-term visa.

 

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400 Expats Granted Gold Card Permanent Residency in UAE

 

DUBAI – “ASWAQ”

Four hundred expats have so far been granted the gold card residency visas in the UAE, and a further 6,400 gold card visas will be issued by the local authorities by the end of the year.

The UAE announced that it would grant 5 or 10-year residency visas to “exceptional” professionals to “facilitate business and create an attractive and encouraging investment environment” in the country, as well as enhance its economic and social attractiveness and boost stability.

The permanent residency visa can be renewed automatically, so long as they satisfy the General Directorate of Residency and Foreigners Affairs’ (GDRFA) terms and conditions and are still employed in the same activity.

The gold card is offered to exceptional professionals such as CEOs and real estate investors (property of more than Dh5 million), inventors, entrepreneurs and specialized doctors, teachers in rare fields, and ‘outstanding’ students with a grade of 95 percent or above in general secondary and university students with a grade of 3.75 and above. Executive managers with a monthly salary of Dh30,000 and above are also eligible for the long-term visa.

The Cabinet decision defines two categories of investors: Investors in a property of a value of Dh5 million or more will be granted a residence for 5 years.

Those making public investments through a deposit, an established company or a business partnership worth Dh10 million or more, or a total investment of not less than Dh10 million in all the areas mentioned as long as non-real estate investments are not less than 60 per cent of the total investment, will be granted a renewable residency visa every 10 years.

The decision outlines the following conditions for both categories: The amount invested shall be wholly owned by the investor and not loaned, and should be proven by supporting documents. Also, there must be investment retention for at least 3 years. A standard financial liability with a financial solvency not exceeding Dh10 million. The long-term visa could also be extended to include business partners (provided that each partner contributes Dh10 million), the spouse and children, as well as one executive director and one advisor.

The start-ups category are subjected to certain criteria such as having a successful start-up with a minimum value of Dh500,000 in a state-approved field, and has secured an approval from an accredited incubator for the activity of the start-up. Major General Mohamed Ahmed Al Marri, director general of the GDRFA in Dubai, said, "If the business falters in the future, the Gold Card visa will be reviewed on a case-to-case basis".

The 6,800 identified as eligible in the first year of this initiative are from 70 countries, with the first batch of recipients who have made total investments of over Dh100bn (US$27bn).

The decision allows investors to enter the country on a 6-month multiple entry visa. In January, the government also granted the first batch of long-term visas to 20 scientists who were the winners and finalists of the ‘Mohammad Bin Rashid Medal for Scientific Excellence’.

The ‘Investors Permanent Residence System’ will be implemented in various phases and will cover all investors residing in the UAE, totaling 7,000 of them. It will also cover other businessmen and entrepreneurs outside the UAE to promote the UAE and further boost the country’s attractiveness as an exceptional hub for investments, and to support its economic and social competitiveness.

Among the UAE’s first Golden Card holders are Balvinder Sahni, a Dubai-based businessman from India who hit the headlines in 2016 after buying a car licence plate for Dh33 million; Lulu Group chairman Yusuff Ali; Bangladeshi businessman Mohammed Rahman; Pure gold Indian tycoon Firoz Merchant; Ziad Saleh, CEO of Alain Pharmacy Group; Dr Shamsheer Vayalil, managing director of VPS Healthcare; Dr Azad Moopen, founding chairman of the Aster DM Healthcare group.

Apart from the gold visa, there are also other categories with a lesser period of validity for small investors and businessmen. 

Applications can be made at accredited typing centres in the UAE, while people abroad can apply online on the Federal Authority For Identity and Citizenship website.

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